Jan 2017 Scoop/co.nz and Pindrop Foundation

For the first time in New Zealand, internationally renowned doctor and researcher in the field of healthy ageing and hearing loss, Frank Lin, M.D, PhD., is presenting the findings of his research at the 2017 Pindrop Foundation Adult Cochlear Implant Forum in March at the University of Auckland, Tamaki Campus.  Just like other things in our bodies that deteriorate with age, hearing is no different. The World Health Organisation estimates that 33% of adults over 65 have a disabling hearing loss. It’s a huge health issue in New Zealand, it’s a safety issue and it’s a quality of life issue that urgently needs addressing. As Associate Professor of Otolaryngology, Geriatric Medicine, Mental Health and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Frank Lin has a special interest in studying the interface between hearing loss and ageing.

He will be discussing the impact of hearing loss on the cognitive and physical functioning of older adults and the role of hearing therapies in mitigating these effects. "My clinical practice is dedicated to the medical and surgical management of hearing conditions, and I study research questions that lie at the interface of hearing loss, ageing, and public health. I investigate these ideas in analysis of large epidemiological data sets. I’m looking forward to discussing those findings with the cochlear implant community in New Zealand,” says Lin. He and other speakers will share their expertise and experience of cochlear implants as a treatment intervention for severe hearing loss and the impact of hearing loss on health in adults.

Lee Schoushkoff, CEO of the Pindrop Foundation says, “We are honoured to host Dr Frank Lin, Anthony Bishop, Dr David Welch and other inspiring leaders in the field of cochlear implants and hearing health at the 2017 forum. Bringing together experts and their collective wisdom from the cochlear implant community challenges us all to create a brighter hearing future for New Zealanders affected by severe hearing loss.”